fbpx

Blog: Taking inspiration from awards

The 2018 Cannes Lions Awards have been won and run for another year and it’s worth checking out some of the great campaigns and ideas.

Despite the ongoing debate and disappointment that many of the PR campaigns continue to be attributed to advertising agencies, there are some great ideas that are a tribute to the continued evolution of the practice of public relations.

Grand Prix Winner Trash Isles is clearly a great campaign, centred around the creative idea of transforming a pile of trash in the middle of the ocean into an officially recognised country – complete with a currency!

A few other personal favourites were:

  • Turning Beer into Water where Anheuser-Busch re-tooled its production line to produce canned water (rather than beer) to deliver fresh drinking water to people caught up in natural disasters from California to the Gulf Coast.
  • KFC ‘FCK’  where simply changing one letter in their name, and authentically responding to (literally) running out of chicken, turned a crisis into a great PR stunt.
  • The Most German Supermarket saw a German supermarket, to showcase the importance of diversity in this age of Trump and Brexit, open a store with groceries it would sell if they banned ingredients from other countries (i.e. not many)

As we’ve heard across a number of podcasts, creativity is an important currency for all PR practitioners. So awards like these provide a great source of inspiration to keep challenging the status quo.

Next month I’ll be judging the PRIA Golden Target Awards and look forward to seeing many great local campaigns.

Blog: In an age of distrust; trust matters

A survey released by Roy Morgan last week found the ABC is by far Australia’s most trusted media organisation.

Trust in the ABC was driven by its lack of bias, quality journalism and ethics. It is an interesting result after further cuts to the ABC budget in the May Federal Budget and recent speculation that it may be privatised.

Roy Morgan spoke to 4000 Australians and asked then which brands they trust and which they distrust.

At the other end of the spectrum Facebook – and social media in general – is deeply distrusted by the Australian public.

Social Media has what Roy Morgan calls a Net Trust Score of minus 42%.

To put that in context, the banking industry, which has been battered by the Royal Commission, has a Net Trust Score of only minus 18 so that shows you the level of distrust in social media in an age when fake news has become a common meme.

Roy Morgan outlines 5 reasons why distrust matters:

  • Distrust triggers audience churn
  • Distrust kills audience engagement
  • Distrust kills advertiser spend
  • Distrust is the tipping point for reputational damage
  • Distrust is the bellweather for an unsustainable future

The Walkley Foundation in its recent submission to the ACCC digital media inquiry said: “Fake news is simply easier. Shaping a fake story takes less time than digging out true stories. In fact, it’s so simple that bots can do it. This means that the sheer volume of manufactured news overwhelms true news.”

However, the rise of fake news has eroded trust – especially in social media – and according to Roy Morgan the rise of distrust can have significant commercial implications.

 

 

BLOG: There’s something big going on in the world of Comms

You may not be aware but the very foundations on which public relations has been built is being discussed, debated and (potentially) redefined.

The Dublin Conversation, as it has been called, is a 100 day challenge (starting from May 22) to make sense of how public relations practice needs to evolve and change because “there has never been a more critical need for a redefined, revitalised and rejuvenated public relations”.

I’d encourage you to get involved here.

In a whitepaper to start the conversation, UK-based PR practitioner Andy Green, with help from numerous supporters, outlines seven steps to understand why the Dublin Conversation is needed. At a high level these are:

  1. What was previously an academic debate about ‘What is public relations?’ is now an urgent task for our society.
  2. You need to be looking from somewhere completely different to define ‘public relations’. It’s emergent.
  3. We have witnessed the emergence of the ‘Comms’ era and need to evolve the PESO model
  4. You cannot define ‘Public Relations’ in isolation – it exists and works in polarity with advertising
  5. Earned trust is the pivotal touchstone for public relations – and validates existing accepted definitions
  6. Public Relations activity is scoped by the process of earning trust
  7. It’s urgent. We need to begin an emergent, bottom-up conversation for change

And the goal at the end is to come up with a Dublin Definition on Public Relations which in its current (draft) form is:

Public relations is born out of the need to earn trust for any social interaction. Effective Public Relations creates better influence, relationships, reputation, social capital and word-of-mouth conversations.

Public Relations operates in a ‘Comms’ environment, working alongside advertising and other communication disciplines to achieve familiarity by making you more known, liked, trusted, front-of-mind, or being talked about through using Own, Shared, Earned, or Paid-for channels.

The goal is to encourage a bottom up debate to refine and evolve this draft definition, and debate and agree the underlying principles, with the outcome to be presented a major international PR conference in October in, you guessed it, Dublin.

The paper builds on current theoretical models, brings in new concepts and approaches and most importantly looks to link theory to practice.

There will no doubt be things in here you disagree with, things you may not have known, things you may not have thought about, or things you may have been championing for many years.

For every practitioner, there is a clear call to action to get the Dublin Conversation going:

  1. Reflect on what you currently define as ‘public relations’. Compare and contrast with the draft Dublin Definitions
  2. If you have new feelings, insights or ideas share them at www.prplace.com
  3. Spread the word. Tell at least two people.

I hope at least two people reading this put their views forward. I am certainly be adding my views and I am excited to see how this debate evolves.

 

Blog: The rise and demise of Sir Martin Sorrell

It’s been a month since Sir Martin Sorrell was ousted from the head of the global agency holding group WPP.

He built the world’s largest advertising agency and in the process became an accidental PR mogul, whose empire grew to include some of Australia’s (and the world’s) biggest PR agencies, including Ogilvy, Hill & Knowlton and Burson-Marstellar.

A lot has been written and said over the rise and demise of Sir Martin Sorrell, so here’s five articles that give a good snapshot of one of the most unexpected industry stories this year:

  1. The New Yorker on the rise, reign and fall of Martin Sorrell
  2. Arun Sudhaman and the Holmes Report give a wrap of industry response to the news
  3. An insider’s guide to working with Marin Sorrell
  4. David Brain on Martin Sorrell’s advocacy for agency model
  5. The Wall Street Journal on why WPP may be better off without Martin Sorrell

But it may not be all over yet with the FT reporting Sir Martin Sorrell may ‘start again’.

BLOG: You are not the customer you are the product

The Social Network forever engraved Facebook into contemporary pop culture, but its latest controversy is causing many to more deeply consider the personal information they have for a long time been giving away.

cambridge-analytica-facebook

The hits to Facebook’s reputation keep coming thick and fast with Cambridge Analytica data breach being the latest issue in a long list of controversies, some of which include:

The latest crisis has hit Facebook where it hurts most – its share price – and comes at a time when individuals are increasingly realising the importance of data.

While there has been much written about how organisations can benefit from the rise of big data, individuals are equally becoming aware of privacy implications and the value of the personal information they have, to date, freely shared.

The way Mark Zuckerberg handled the latest controversy was a PR lesson in how not to handle a crisis. But that is a story for another day.

The question for Facebook is how it rebuilds trust with users (who are now actually it product if you listen to some). In an age when trust in business, government, media and even more recently sport, is at an all time low, this will be no easy feat.

The #deletefacebook hashtag continues to trend, with big names such as billionare Elon Musk, actor Will Ferrell and numerous brands leading the campaign to stand up against Facebook misusing the personal information of users.

With 2 billion users Facebook its unlikely #deletefacebook will materially impact Facebook’s prominence in our day to day lives but it will be interesting to see how long it can continue to withstand controversies like this that go to the core personal principles of privacy and trust.

BLOG: Purpose is now a comms must-have, but it’s got to ring true to label

When it comes to publicising purpose, corporate organisations need to tread carefully in order to appear authentic, writes Paul Cheal, managing director of financial and corporate comms agency Honner.

March 6, 2018

Larry Fink’s annual New Year letter to CEOs received much media attention and emphasised the need for brands to not only generate profit but have a higher social purpose. The note kicked off a debate that has now well and truly hit Australian shores.

According to Fink, the CEO of the world’s largest asset management firm BlackRock: “To prosper over time, every company must not only deliver financial performance, but also show how it makes a positive contribution to society.”

For organisations, and in particular financial organisations, this poses many questions around proactively supporting and advocating for societal issues.

Ken Henry, chair of National Australia Bank, picked up this theme in recent weeks saying that businesses must demonstrate a social purpose that drives the way the firm operates. Organisations, he said, need to demonstrate that they are more than just profit.

The most publicised social purpose campaign in recent times was Qantas CEO Alan Joyce’s support for marriage equality – for which he received a pie in the face, but ultimately widespread praise.

Social issues don’t necessarily need to be controversial. Richard Branson says the focus at Virgin includes diversity and inclusion, giving back to communities, and many important global environmental and social issues – from climate change to LGBT rights to ending the war on drugs. All worthy causes.

Late last year, Honner worked with Ariel Investments to provide a joint submission to ASIC calling on the regulator to create a platform whereby local banks, investment managers and other financial companies can support financial literacy programs in Australian primary schools.

It is no surprise the rise of social purpose for organisations has grown as the number of gen Y and millennials grow as both employees and customers. More than eight in 10 millennials (81%) expect companies to make a public commitment to good corporate citizenship.

Brands are increasingly responding to this trend.

In a recent interview with the Australian Financial Review, Coca Cola Amatil CEO Alison Watkins said stakeholders expect more than simply short-term profit delivery. “At Coca Cola Amatil, we need to be leaders in reducing obesity and waste. I also recognise that I am responsible and accountable to our shareholders; however, I look at that as a long-term responsibility even though we have some short-term shareholders.”

From a communications perspective, building a consistent message and projecting your organisation’s values builds trust and generates commitment — whether from employees, customers, industry or other stakeholders.

However, the social purpose needs to be true-to-label. It needs to reflect who you are as an organisation and it needs to resonate through your entire organisation. Alan Joyce drove the marriage equality debate from the top down; Virgin’s values flow through all it does; Honner works to educate individuals on financial services every day.

Anything less than an open, transparent and true-to-label approach will be quickly spotted.pexels-photo-207896.jpeg

This blog was first published on Mumbrella.

Powered by WordPress.com.

Up ↑