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Blog: In an age of distrust; trust matters

A survey released by Roy Morgan last week found the ABC is by far Australia’s most trusted media organisation.

Trust in the ABC was driven by its lack of bias, quality journalism and ethics. It is an interesting result after further cuts to the ABC budget in the May Federal Budget and recent speculation that it may be privatised.

Roy Morgan spoke to 4000 Australians and asked then which brands they trust and which they distrust.

At the other end of the spectrum Facebook – and social media in general – is deeply distrusted by the Australian public.

Social Media has what Roy Morgan calls a Net Trust Score of minus 42%.

To put that in context, the banking industry, which has been battered by the Royal Commission, has a Net Trust Score of only minus 18 so that shows you the level of distrust in social media in an age when fake news has become a common meme.

Roy Morgan outlines 5 reasons why distrust matters:

  • Distrust triggers audience churn
  • Distrust kills audience engagement
  • Distrust kills advertiser spend
  • Distrust is the tipping point for reputational damage
  • Distrust is the bellweather for an unsustainable future

The Walkley Foundation in its recent submission to the ACCC digital media inquiry said: “Fake news is simply easier. Shaping a fake story takes less time than digging out true stories. In fact, it’s so simple that bots can do it. This means that the sheer volume of manufactured news overwhelms true news.”

However, the rise of fake news has eroded trust – especially in social media – and according to Roy Morgan the rise of distrust can have significant commercial implications.

 

 

A Public Relations Podcast: Smoke Signal Episode 2: The Creativity Coach

In this episode Andy Eklund, a.k.a. the Creativity Coach, takes us into the wonderful world of creativity.

Listen now or subscribe on iTunes

According to Andy, who defines business creativity as the act of combining two different ideas in an unusual way to create something unique, useful or new, creativity is one of the most important life skills that everyone should learn. He believes it should also be taught in schools!

Creativity seems and ever more important skill for PR practitioners where creativity is becoming more and more vital as brands look to differentiate themselves and cut through the clutter.

Andy currently runs his own creativity coaching business, having held both in house and agency roles, including Global Creative Director for Burson Marsteller in the 1990’s where he was involved in 4-6 brainstorms a day.

According to Andy brainstorming gets a bad wrap. In reality brainstorming is simply the act of your brain coming up with an idea – whether that’s in a formal team setting or a chat in the hallway.

Some of his tips on brainstorms that he discusses in this podcast are:

  • You need ice breakers to help participants become creative
  • Understand 90/10 rule – it’ll take at least 10 ideas to get one good one
  • To brainstorm in the absence of the audience is a complete waste of time

We also discuss the fact that while creativity is a right side of the brain, it also requires discipline and consistency that is left brain thinking. And relax, creativity can be taught, you just have to really want to learn.

In the news this week we look at what feels like the only story going around – the Facebook Cambridge Analytica controversy. The story has continued to roll on since I wrote this blog and it shows no sign of since Mark Zuckerberg appeared in front of Congress to admit guilt and apologise.

There is no doubt a lot more to come on this story but restoring trust will be a key challenge now for Facebook.

If you enjoy this podcast then do be sure to check out Andy’s blog www.andyeklund.com where you can get a lot more tips on creativity.

 

BLOG: You are not the customer you are the product

The Social Network forever engraved Facebook into contemporary pop culture, but its latest controversy is causing many to more deeply consider the personal information they have for a long time been giving away.

cambridge-analytica-facebook

The hits to Facebook’s reputation keep coming thick and fast with Cambridge Analytica data breach being the latest issue in a long list of controversies, some of which include:

The latest crisis has hit Facebook where it hurts most – its share price – and comes at a time when individuals are increasingly realising the importance of data.

While there has been much written about how organisations can benefit from the rise of big data, individuals are equally becoming aware of privacy implications and the value of the personal information they have, to date, freely shared.

The way Mark Zuckerberg handled the latest controversy was a PR lesson in how not to handle a crisis. But that is a story for another day.

The question for Facebook is how it rebuilds trust with users (who are now actually it product if you listen to some). In an age when trust in business, government, media and even more recently sport, is at an all time low, this will be no easy feat.

The #deletefacebook hashtag continues to trend, with big names such as billionare Elon Musk, actor Will Ferrell and numerous brands leading the campaign to stand up against Facebook misusing the personal information of users.

With 2 billion users Facebook its unlikely #deletefacebook will materially impact Facebook’s prominence in our day to day lives but it will be interesting to see how long it can continue to withstand controversies like this that go to the core personal principles of privacy and trust.

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